Heroin use surging CDC reports

heroin abuse

CDC reports on heroin abuse

Heroin use has skyrocketed over the last ten years. According to federal health officials, the rise in opiate-based overdoses is synonymous to countries growing prescription drug epidemic.
A new report says that the “Annual average rates of past-year heroin use increased from 1.6 per 1,000 persons aged ≥12 years in 2002–2004 to 2.6 per 1,000 in 2011–2013”. That is a 63% increase in the rate of heroin use since 2002.
The rate of heroin abuse or dependence climbed 90% over the same period, according to the study by researchers from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Deaths caused by heroin overdoses nearly quadrupled between 2002 and 2013, claiming 8,257 lives in 2013.
In all, more than half a million people used heroin in 2013, up nearly 150% since 2007, the report said.
Heroin use remained highest for the historically hardest-hit group: poor young men living in cities. But increases were spread across all demographic groups, including women and people with private insurance and high incomes — groups associated with the parallel rise in prescription drug use over the past decade.

CDC on drug abuse

The findings appear in a Vital Signs report published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
“As a doctor who started my career taking care of patients with HIV and other complications from injection drugs, it’s heartbreaking to see injection drug use making a comeback in the U.S.,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the CDC.
All but 4% of the people who used heroin in the past year also used another drug, such as cocaine, marijuana or alcohol, according to the report. Indeed, 61% of heroin users used at least three different drugs.
The authors of the new study highlighted a “particularly strong” relationship between the use of prescription painkillers and heroin. People who are addicted to narcotic painkillers are 40 times more likely to misuse heroin, according to the study.
Once reserved for cancer and end-of-life pain, these narcotics now are widely prescribed for conditions ranging from dental work to chronic back pain.
“We are priming people to addiction to heroin with overuse of prescription opiates,” Frieden said at a news conference this month. “More people are primed for heroin addiction because they are addicted to prescription opiates, which are, after all, essentially the same chemical with the same impact on the brain.”

For more information on heroin and prescription addiction and recovery. Contact the professionals in St Petersurg at Recovery Resources of Florida to learn of options available at your disposal in your path to recovery.

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